Get “The Case for Barry Bonds in the Hall of Fame” today!

Get your copy of The Case for Barry Bonds in the Hall of Fame: The Untold and Forgotten Stories of Baseball’s Home Run King by yours truly — today! A perfect gift for the baseball fan or Giants fan in your household!

Sportswriter K. P. Wee asks the question that many MLB fans have been thinking—Should Barry Bonds be in the Baseball Hall of Fame?

In his 22 years in the Major Leagues, Bonds, who played for the Pittsburgh Pirates and the San Francisco Giants, was:

•the All-time Home Run leader with 762 home runs

•a seven-time MVP

•a 14-time All-Star

•an eight-time Gold Glove winner

As the final year to vote this home run king in begins, The Case for Barry Bonds in the Baseball Hall of Fame looks at his stunning career from all aspects including his personal life as the son of a baseball legend, as well as never-before told stories of his generosity and mentorship towards other ballplayers. The book also looks at the stories of his distaste for the sports press, as well as the role of racism in professional sports, and how this impacted his career.

Join sportswriter K. P. Wee as he shares insights and interviews from baseball insiders, Hall of Fame voters and baseball legends, as he puts to rest the question “Does Barry Bonds belong in the Baseball Hall of Fame?”

The K.P. Wee Podcast, Episode 7: Former Dodger General Manager Fred Claire

The K.P. Wee Podcast, Episode 7: Former Dodger General Manager Fred Claire

Fred Claire is a former General Manager for the Los Angeles Dodgers, a role he held for 29 years from 1969 to 1998.

Following his time working in professional baseball, he started his own business management consultancy for professional sports and entertainment.

He is a founding partner at Scoutables.com, which offers daily scouting reports on every player in Major League Baseball based on recent performance.

Fred shares memories from his Dodger days and offers advice to students and other young people who want to get into sports.

He also talks mentorship and discusses his new book with Tim Madigan (which was released in July 2020) titled Extra Innings: Fred Claire’s Journey to City of Hope and Finding a World Championship Team.

Here’s a glimpse of what you’ll learn: 

  • [2:52] Fred on his passion for mentorship
  • [4:10] Getting started in the sports industry
  • [6:58] Practical steps young people can take to find a mentor in the sports world
  • [9:02] Fred’s encounter with a young Tony Robbins and his brother
  • [13:44] Trading players as a General Manager
  • [21:44] Fred on the Dodgers’ incredible attention to detail in every aspect of training
  • [25:44] How Fred figured that the Dodgers would win the 1988 championship
  • [28:10] Fred’s cancer journey at City of Hope—the story behind the book Extra Innings
  • [34:35] Parting advice to students and other young people on chasing your dreams

Key Quotes by Fred:

  • “Whatever I can do to help others, guide others, educate others, and inspire others—whatever it is—I get great satisfaction from that.”
  • “I’ve always been struck by people, including professional baseball players, who simply had a determination that they were going to reach their goals, and may or may not reach it, but at the end of the day knew that they did the best that they could.”
  • “Words themselves carry great meaning. It doesn’t have to be receiving something in return, because what I found in life is that, many times, those things come later.”
  • “I think it’s a fair statement that the Dodgers have invested more money and more people in analytics than any team in baseball.”
  • “Never, ever be afraid to get a second opinion. I’ve been very fortunate to be able to help a number of people get a second opinion at City of Hope. I just think that’s so important because one’s life can be at stake.”

Follow Fred Claire on Twitter @Fred_Claire / Connect with Fred on LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/fred-claire-1605a01

For more information about the book Extra Innings, please visit https://www.tinyurl.com/FredClaireExtraInnings

If you enjoyed the intro music, please follow Roger Chong on Twitter/Instagram: @chongroger

TB12 to TB… So, why all the glowing comments about the signing?

(Also published on kpwee.com)

Tom Brady made it official earlier this week that he was leaving New England to test free agency. Within hours, news circulated that the six-time Super Bowl champ was going to sign with Tampa Bay.

Virtually all of the commentary on “TB12 to TB” was positive.

But I just don’t understand why.

Okay, Bucs’ attendance will see an increase, which is a positive thing for the franchise.

But remember last year when there was all this talk about how nobody at Brady’s age had started all 16 games in a season at the quarterback position?

Guess what? As much as I admire Brady, he’s another year older, and again, this is uncharted territory for QBs in the NFL. Yes, Brady is the greatest of all-time, but Father Time is undefeated.

Also, Brady’s going from a team that has relatively weaker competition in the AFC East, to a team that gets to play Drew Brees’ Saints twice, Matt Ryan’s Falcons twice. And don’t dismiss a rejuvenated Teddy Bridgewater (who was 5-0 filling in for the injured Brees in New Orleans in 2019) and his Panthers, as Brady will have to face them twice as well.

The wins aren’t going to come as easily as with New England, regardless of the talent around Brady in Tampa Bay. Don’t forget, nobody has played a full schedule at QB at his age (he’ll turn 43 before the 2020 season starts), the competition is stiffer, and it might not be as smooth a year as many now seem to think.

The sad-sack Yotes…?

To be honest, when I came across this ESPN.com story back in mid-December…

… my reaction was, “Hey, we’re talking about the hapless Coyotes here… The Coyotes!!! A team that has never, ever gotten over the hump,” and even Wayne Gretzky (as head coach) couldn’t transform that team into a contender.

Here, we had analysts overreacting to the fact that they were doing well back in December, and there were people thinking the Coyotes — the Coyotes!! — were going to finish second in the division and perhaps even crack the 100-point barrier.

Admittedly, it’s “easier” now to reach 100 points given the fact that teams receive cheap points for overtime losses and shootout losses, so point totals tend to be inflated in this era.

But c’mon, the Coyotes? And, of course, as the calendar flips to February 2020, the Yotes, unsurprisingly – to me, anyway – are an eighth seed in the Western Conference, losers of five straight and eight of their past 10.

The good news for them? With 59 points, they’re only two points back of Vegas, while Vancouver (64 points) and Edmonton (62) occupy the top two spots in the Pacific Division.

But finishing second and with 100 points? Yes, there are still plenty of games left – but not really – but c’mon, these are the Coyotes we’re talking about….

Does anyone proofread anymore?

Veteran sportswriter Bob Nightengale was, unfortunately, ridiculed on Twitter this week after hash tagging “Cuns” – and not “Cubs” – on one of this tweets.

Look, tweeting is something that is done quickly and maybe even the best makes a typo sometimes. It’s just silly to have so many people tweet back at Nightengale to mock him.

What’s worse than goofing up on a tweet, though, is giving wrong information on a story posted on a website that draws a lot of clicks – and not have anyone proofread that story.

Here are some examples from ESPN.com:

This one starts off well. It’s ESPN giving the up-to-date playoff schedule.

But since when does a best-of-five series have a Game Three as potentially unnecessary?

Wow, so ESPN is saying that a team could win the first two games of the division series and the series is over!

And yes, Tom Brady is, undoubtedly, a first-ballot Hall of Famer. But you need to have retired first to be elected to the Hall of Fame.

Yet, ESPN has already crowned the 42-year-old QB as a HOFer… while he’s still playing for the Patriots!

Yes, some love for Brady – and that’s great. But not so much for the Patriots, who’ve been to the last three Super Bowls (not two). Here’s an ESPN.com preview of the 2019 Week One Steelers-Patriots contest (with New England coming off its third consecutive NFL title game), via the Associated Press:

So, I get it that even a sportswriter might goof up on Twitter – and people should be ashamed of themselves to mock him or call him out on social media – but a site like ESPN.com messing up things that should have been proofread? Awful.